qiBuild documentation

Worktree and projects

Every tool is using a worktree.

The WorkTree class contains just a list of paths, which are simple Project objects. Those do not have a name, and are identified by there relative path to the worktree. They are stored in a worktree cache, in <worktree root>/.qi/worktree.xml

<worktree>
|__ .qi
    |__ worktree.xml
|__ foo
|__ bar
    |__ baz

Here for instance you could have two projects: one in foo, and the other in bar

Projects are added to the worktree with qisrc add, qisrc remove, but the `

Projects can also contain sub-projects, providing they have a qiproject.xml at their root:

<!-- in bar/qiproject.xml -->
<project>
  <project src="baz" />
</project>

Here, if the bar path is registered to the worktree and bar/baz exists, then a project in bar/baz will be created too

Using the worktree with a qiBuild tool

Then, other classes creates their own kind of projects using the registered paths in the worktree.

For instance, to have a buildable project, you must have

  • a <qibuild> tag in qiproject.xml
  • a CMakeLists.txt file next to the qiproject.xml

So the list of buildable paths (from where you can run CMake) is always a sublist of all the projects in the worktree.

Buildable projects are then identified by their names, which must be unique in the worktree.

This makes it possible to express dependencies between buildable projects using just the names, and not caring where the build projects are actually located on the filesystem

It also means you can nest qibuild and qidoc projects anyway you want.

For instance:

  • a build project at the root in foo, with the doc in foo/doc

    <!-- in foo/qiproject.xml -->
    <project>
      <qibuild name="foo" />
      <project src="doc" />
    </project>
    
    <!-- in foo/doc/qiproject.xml -->
    
    <project>
      <qidoc name="foo" type="shinx" />
    </project>
    
  • Two nested build projects in the same git project (best avoided):

    <!-- in top/qiproject.xml -->
    <project>
      <project src="libhello" />
      <qibuild name="helloworld">
        <depends buildtime="true" runtime="true" names="libhello" />
      <qibuild/>
    </project>
    
    <!-- in top/libhello/qiproject.xml -->
    <project>
      <qibuild name="libhello" />
    </project>
    

    In this case, the libhello build project lies within the helloworld build project (which is at the root in top).

    While nested build projects are supported by qibuild, they are best avoided: nested build projects complicate mapping between projects and path which makes using git log and continuous integration unnecessarilly harder (see bellow).

  • Two build projects in the same git project, forming a “flat hierarchy”:

    <!-- in top/qiproject.xml -->
    <project>
      <project src="libhello" />
      <project src="helloworld" />
    <project>
    
    <!-- in top/libhello/qiproject.xml -->
    <project>
      <qibuild name="libhello" />
    </project>
    
    <!-- in top/helloworld/qiproject.xml -->
    <project>
      <qibuild name="helloworld">
        <depends buildtime="true" runtime="true" names="libhello" />
      <qibuild/>
    </project>
    

    Note that, while the two build projects are nested within the root qiproject, the root one is not a build project, so there is no nested build project.

    With this layout, looking at the history of the helloworld project is as easy as

    cd top
    gitk -- helloworld
    

    It is easy to setup per-project contiguous integration jobs triggered by git commit using path filters. Eg. if a commit only changes files in the libhello sub-folder, the libhello job should be triggered but not the helloworld one.